FOI Alyson Carrel (Northwestern) and LCSW Jasmine Atwell (Loyola ‘JD22) recently discussed Sharon Press and Ellen Deason’s new article, “Mediation: Embedded Assumptions of Whiteness?,” published in the Cardozo Journal of Conflict Resolution (and available on SSRN). Press and Deason’s article explores concepts from the book, Me and White Supremacy, as applied to the practice, process, and structure of mediation. Earlier in July, Jasmine and Alyson discussed their reactions to the article, why the article might be important to assign in a mediation class, and how faculty can approach facilitating a conversation about the article. Alyson’s writeup of this conversation…
As efforts at the federal and individual states level evolve every day at almost a breakneck pace to address challenges and needs related to the COVID-19 outbreak, here is a updated running list of some of the top actions taken at the federal level that we thought would be helpful to the healthcare industry (Caveat, this is not an exhaustive list): …
The title is a quote from Einstein, and it’s true. In addition to thinking it’s better to approach matters from a positive perspective, I think he is getting at being open to ideas. When someone has an idea, some people jump on the bandwagon too fast and others pick the idea apart until nothing is left. Neither of these actions or reactions is helpful. Instead, new ideas should be approached with an equal amount of positive skepticism and thoughts on how to make the idea a success. By positive skepticism, I mean you bring negative thoughts in a constructive manner…
Last time I focused on understanding and explaining the law generally using syllogisms. Today, I’m going to focus solely on questions presented. The structure of appellate briefs themselves have been compared to syllogisms,[1] but the most helpful place I have……
Rochester, NY, mayor Lovely Warren has been indicted on gun charges, not long after her husband was busted for drug and gun violations. More detail on her husband’s arrest here. He was busted with $60,000 in cocaine, $100,000 in cash. In their home, police found three unregistered handguns and a banned “assault rifle.” The mayor’s excuse was that she knew nothing of what her husband was doing. Sure….…
As an immigrant living in the United States, a criminal conviction for shoplifting could lead to your deportation if it qualifies as a deportable offense, such as an aggravated felony or a crime of moral turpitude. If you are facing shoplifting charges as an immigrant, contact a criminal defense attorney immediately. You will need an attorney’s assistance to navigate your case if you wish to build the strongest possible defense. Criminal Charges That Could Lead to Deportation The U.S. government has the ability to deport all immigrants, including documented immigrants with valid green cards, for violating certain laws, including immigration…
TOPDOG Legal Marketing, LLC is excited to announce that its team has expanded with the addition of Arizona paralegal Nathan B. Chase. Nathan began his tenure with the company as an intern and has now joined the law firm marketing company’s staff as a full-time, permanent employee providing legal and administrative support. To his position on the TOPDOG staff, Nathan brings experience in human resources and an Associate in Applied Science degree in Paralegal from Rio Salado College in Arizona. In his time with the company, he has trained in legal marketing, research, and search engine marketing. Nathan’s work with…
The other day a friend and I were discussing foreign cyberattacks and probes that appeared to be, if not government-launched, at least made with government protection and immunity. Prominent among these being Russian and Chinese hacking. My friend suggested an imaginative use of letters of marque and reprisal, as authorized by the Constitution. These were the basis of privateering, perhaps the ultimate in privatization. The government would authorize the captain of a civilian vessel to seize enemy shipping, and sell it for his own profit. The letters ensured that if he was captured, he would be treated as a POW…
In 2001, the concept of “never events” was introduced.  The idea was that a never event was one which was identifiable, caused serious injury or death and was almost always preventable.  The original list has grown and there are now 29 recognized never events. Never events are grouped into seven categories. Surgical or procedural events Product or device events Patient protection events Care management events Environmental events Radiologic events Criminal events Examples of surgical events are operations on the wrong patient, on the wrong body part, right patient but wrong surgery or leaving a surgical instrument or foreign object behind…
Parentheticals are all over legal writing. But rarely do folks talk about why (or whether that’s a good thing). Adding a tidbit of insight or explanation in a parenthetical can do wonders for readers. You can amplify a critical point, provide illuminating examples, and more. But too many thoughtless parentheticals make this tool worthless. And many legal writers fall into the trap of replacing their own explanation and reasoning about the law with a list of parentheticals. Let’s start with when legal writers use parentheticals the wrong way. First, parentheticals are not the right place to include critical points for…
A lane change is a relatively routine procedure. Most people change lanes at least once each time they get out on the roadway. However, lane changes can lead to severe accidents. Here, we want to discuss who could be at fault in the aftermath of a lane change accident in Arizona. In some cases, only one driver will be at fault for these incidents, but it is entirely possible for more than one driver to be at fault for a lane change crash. Fault in an Arizona Lane Change Accident When a vehicle accident occurs, a police report will…