Appellate Advocacy Blog

In the play and movie, Amadeus, Mozart proudly debuts one of his new compositions for the emperor. The emperor’s verdict took Mozart by surprise. The composition was fine, the emperor intoned, but it suffered from “too many notes.” In providing some “helpful” criticism, the emperor advises, “cut a few and it will be perfect.”

While briefs do not approach the timelessness or artistry of a Mozart opera, courts and judges sometimes offer the same critique: “too many (foot)notes.” The judicial critique can have more validity than the emperor’s issue in Amadeus. The federal court in the District of Columbia, as
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