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Video content is an effective way to connect with potential clients online, and consumers across many industries are responding positively to video content. A compelling marketing video can boost conversion rates for your firm by directly addressing your potential clients’ pain points and highlighting how you can help them with their legal issue. Marketing videos can also be repurposed on your social media pages to reach a broader audience and drive more traffic to your website. But at what point does video content begin to hurt your website’s functionality and conversion capability?

Read on for the pros and cons of
Continue Reading Pros and cons of video content on your website

Your reputation is formed by how people perceive you, good or bad. Online, it is a function of your presence and activities on the internet, making you vulnerable to risks that can tarnish your reputation. A seemingly harmless post may be misconstrued, your brand may be unfairly attacked, or saboteurs may post damaging content about you. These issues can lead to defamation suits and the need for an internet defamation attorney.

Damaged reputations can be costly and difficult to repair. Taking steps to alleviate some of the risks can protect your good name and character. Here are five steps to
Continue Reading 5 steps to protect your online reputation

In the play and movie, Amadeus, Mozart proudly debuts one of his new compositions for the emperor. The emperor’s verdict took Mozart by surprise. The composition was fine, the emperor intoned, but it suffered from “too many notes.” In providing some “helpful” criticism, the emperor advises, “cut a few and it will be perfect.”

While briefs do not approach the timelessness or artistry of a Mozart opera, courts and judges sometimes offer the same critique: “too many (foot)notes.” The judicial critique can have more validity than the emperor’s issue in Amadeus. The federal court in the District of Columbia, as
Continue Reading Too many (foot)notes

Legal support is important when operating a YouTube channel, especially given the many legal issues content creators and YouTubers are exposed to. Some content creators may not find it necessary or consider it a priority at first, as many start and maintain their channels primarily as hobbies. However, legal support becomes necessary as a channel grows, gains popularity, and develops into a valuable asset.

Below are five instances in which YouTubers and content creators should consider hiring an internet lawyer to help with their channel.
1. When Negotiating Contracts
Brand deals, affiliate marketing, and partnerships with multi-channel networks (MCNs) are
Continue Reading When should you hire a YouTube lawyer to help with your channel?

This topic covers a lot of ground in my mind. Depending on what you’re reading, you may be escaping your day or learning something new. It may be pure fun or investing in yourself and your future.

It means reading news and knowing what’s going on in the world. It means reading books including fiction and non-fiction, which can include books related to my career and business. To me, reading for all of these reasons is important and adds value to my life, whether an entertaining fiction book, an article on an area of the law relevant to my practice,
Continue Reading Read, learn, and invest in yourself

My recent piece about introversion seems to have struck a nerve.  It stimulated the most – and most intense – reactions to any of my posts.  Several people emphatically identified with it, saying that they felt that it was about them.

I’m sure a lot of other readers felt that way too.

Introversion is a mostly invisible part of people’s identities. We are pretty aware of many aspects of our identities such as our physical and demographic characteristics, relationships, religious and political perspectives, liking certain sports teams or performers, etc.

But many people who feel introverted have only a vague
Continue Reading Coming out as introverted – even as a lawyer

It’s not that difficult to be persuasive. Below are a few tips to increase the persuasive value of your arguments.

1.    Keep it simple, talk like a normal human being, and get out of the weeds.

If you want to persuade a court (or anyone), simplify your narrative. Think of it this way: if you had only one sentence to explain why a court should rule in your favor, what would you say? If you had only thirty seconds to explain why the Second Amendment protects an individual right to bear arms, what would you say? Simplifying your narrative, making
Continue Reading Commonsense tips on persuading judges … and people

Student loans plague the minds of millions of Americans, but people often have more financial obligations than student loan debt to worry about. Your budget may already be stretched thin between other debts, bills, and necessities. If you are experiencing financial hardship on top of everything, it may feel impossible to honor every financial obligation, including your student loan payments.

Unfortunately, defaulting on your private student loans can greatly impact your financial health, resulting in consequences you may not have anticipated. Many people don’t realize that defaulting on federal student loans can affect your job prospects, and the same
Continue Reading Defaulting on private student loans … and my job prospects

Smiling at the Beginning of my bike workout on South Mountain

It’s 50 days until my first full Ironman race – Ironman Lake Placid. It’s taken nearly 3 years to get here.

After my coach and I did the Half Ironman Maine in 2019, we signed up for Ironman Mont-Tremblant (near Montreal, Canada) for 2020.

And then COVID hit.

Our race was cancelled, and all got deferred to Ironman Mont-Tremblant in 2021. Then that race was cancelled, not because of COVID infection rates, but because the Canada-U.S. border was still closed. Ironman gave us the option to change to
Continue Reading 50 days until Ironman

Not too long ago I was driving in the car with both junior associates. I was talking to my spouse on the phone (safely via hands free), and in the course of the conversation I used the “s” word–“stupid.” An adorable little 4 year old voice called out from the back seat, “Mommy, we don’t say ‘stupid.'” To which I said, “you are right, I am so sorry.”

This little episode, which has sadly happened more than once, got me thinking about the advice that judges give attorneys. Judges are often very quick to give excellent advice to attorneys, but
Continue Reading Do as I do: Tips on writing briefs … and opinions

Just because the thought comes into your head does not mean it should come out of your mouth. In many situations, it matters what you say next. This is why it’s so important to think before speaking. It doesn’t mean uncomfortable long silences, but it means you need to plan for important conversations, negotiations, or presentations. It also means you need be able to think on your feet.

This can be difficult in emotionally charged situations. But those situations require the most thought and patience.

This was brought home to me a few years ago when an opposing attorney answered
Continue Reading Do you think before speaking?

Contractors in central and southern Arizona know all too well the work hazards that accompany Arizona’s notorious summers. OSHA’s recently launched National Emphasis Program on Outdoor and Indoor Heat Hazards (NEP) provides a useful reminder of the risks of heat stress and how to help workers avoid it.

Before we describe some of the resources at your disposal, let’s briefly discuss the NEP and its application in Arizona. The NEP, which went into effect April 8 and is scheduled to continue for three years, calls for heat-specific workplace inspections in over 70 high-risk industries (including construction) at locations where the
Continue Reading Heat stress: Reducing the safety risks to outdoor workers

Capitalism has done wonders for the world in terms of raising the standard of living for so many people.  Of course, like everything else in this world, capitalism is not an unbridled blessing.  It has its dark side.  When it comes to health care, capitalism has caused a lot of problems.  Among them are the rise of health insurance giants, the growth of hospital chains, big pharma, and the increasing emphasis on medicine as a business whose goal is to make money to name just a few.  Today, I want to discuss how capitalism affects rural hospitals.  Rural hospitals face
Continue Reading Capitalism can be bad for your health

In everything you do you can do better, you can be better. Always. If you disagree you are only fooling yourself and being intellectually dishonest. Investing in yourself is the best investment you can make.

If you put your money in a can and bury it in your backyard, it has no chance to grow. If you invest your money, it has the chance to grow. The corollary is if you don’t take the time to improve yourself, to learn, you will become stagnant and, in this fast-paced world, probably be passed by others. If you work to improve you
Continue Reading We can always do better by working on ourselves

In terms of pro bono service, our profession has a long way to go.

Model Rule of Professional Conduct 6.1 makes clear that “[e]very lawyer has a professional responsibility to provide legal services to those unable to pay.”  To that end, the Rule says that lawyers “should aspire to render at least fifty (50) hours of pro bono publico legal services per year.”

Let’s be honest, though: 50 hours is pretty paltry.  If you take a two-week vacation, you can still satisfy Rule 6.1 with just one pro bono hour per week.  Even for busy lawyers, that’s hardly “aspir[ational].”  Yet
Continue Reading A plea for pro bono service

Rebuttal provides an advocate with an opportunity to point out otherwise undiscussed weaknesses in an opponent’s argument, as well as to emphasize the superiority of the evidence, precedents, and reasoning that supports your client. Five points fundamental points should guide rebuttal:

  • Answer your opponent’s best argument. During your opponent’s argument, you can evaluate your opponent’s framing of the argument and the court’s reaction to them. Many advocates go after the obvious weakness in the argument the court just heard. Doing so can be effective, but, if the argument is available, demonstrating why your opponent’s best argument should not prevail can

  • Continue Reading The art of rebuttal