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If you are reading this post, you’re old enough to understand our message. We have written often about the latest challenge facing our youth. Do you remember the cinnamon challenge, or the duct tape challenge? Both foolish and to some, dangerous.

The latest challenge circulating the internet involves activities at school. One that’s getting some attention on TikTok involves damaging school bathrooms. Removing the soap dispensers or sinks in the boys and girls restrooms is leading to discipline at school, and even formal charges against the student for criminal damage. Spray painting or using markers on the walls result in
Continue Reading Beware of TikTok dangers

Illinois has become the first state to prohibit the police from lying to juveniles that they’re interrogating. Any minor (under 18) in police custody and being questioned about a crime, whether a misdemeanor or felony, is protected if the police are “deceptive” in their interrogation.
The post New law prohibits the police from lying to juveniles in custody appeared first on Askthejudge.
Continue Reading New law prohibits the police from lying to juveniles in custody

In 1969, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that children and teenagers have constitutional rights that must be respected by school officials. This case involved the display of black armbands in protest of the Vietnam war. A school district in Iowa prohibited students from wearing the
The post Once again, Tinker comes before the Supreme Court appeared first on Askthejudge.
Continue Reading Once again, Tinker comes before the Supreme Court

Other than being placed in the “waiting room” (a virtual time-out) by your teacher for not paying attention or goofing off during class, did you think you could be suspended or expelled for something? It happened to a 9-year-old fourth grade student in Louisiana in September, 2020.

Like many of you, Ka Mauri Harrison was in his bedroom taking a test online. He shares his bedroom with an older brother. At some point, his brother came into the room. When a gun fell to the floor, Ka got up from his seat, picked up the gun and placed it by
Continue Reading Beware of what’s on your screen during online schooling

On June 15, 2020, the United States Supreme Court ruled 6-3 that “An employer who fires an individual merely for being gay or transgender defies the law.”

Three separate cases were consolidated for argument before the Court on October 8, 2019. Eight  months later, the court issued its decision ruling that an individual could not be fired or discriminated against in the workplace for merely being gay or transgender. In other words, the prohibition against sex discrimination in the 1964 Civil Rights Act covers sexuality and gender identity. This decision applies to teenagers as well as adults.

In the first
Continue Reading A long overdue win for the LGBTQ community

*This is not a normal Earth Day. Although the theme of this 50th anniversary is climate action, COVID-19 has captured the world’s attention, and for good reason. The livability of our terrestrial home is now in crisis on two fronts. COVID-19 is a public health
The post A Way to Stop Carbon Pollution and Help Americans appeared first on Askthejudge.
Continue Reading A Way to Stop Carbon Pollution and Help Americans

March 27, 2020

While millions of K-12 students are now shut-ins until the coronavirus ebbs, new challenges surface for kids, parents and educators doing their work online. The opportunity for cyberbullying is great, particularly for those not used to online learning.

Professor Sameer Hinduja* of Florida Atlantic University has written a thoughtful and informative article with suggestions to educators about monitoring the students they interact with to protect them from cyberbullying. This includes staying in touch with students, offering comfort and encouraging them to report any  “problematic or abusive content.” Tips to parents include allowing ongoing social contact by Skyping
Continue Reading Social isolation tips for parents & educators during the pandemic

Many of our readers find themselves at home while school is out during the current spread of the coronavirus. Since the end of the school year is near, you may not return until next fall. In the meantime, states are attempting to address the spread of the virus by restricting movement and crowd size, and ordering stay-at-home policies. We are in this together with at least 150 other countries. Our welfare depends on following the advice of medical and public health officials. As of this writing, the United States has over 29,000 cases of the virus, and 376 deaths. The
Continue Reading Coping with Coronavirus (COVID-19)

February 25, 2020

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A new challenge that’s gone viral on certain social platforms may lead to serious injuries or even death. Doctors warn against anyone, including teens who are filming the trick to post online, about the possible consequences.
Referred to as the “Skull Breaker Challenge,” it calls for three people to stand next to each other. The two on the outside jump up first. Then the middle person is told to jump up next. When he or she does, the two on the outside trip the middle person by kicking their legs out from under them. There
Continue Reading Don’t fall for the “skull breaker” challenge

January 10, 2020

That’s the penalty in Vermont proposed in a bill introduced in the state legislature in January, 2020. State Senator John Rodgers quoted statistics showing cellphones as one of the leading causes of teen deaths. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, the use of cellphones are involved in 1.6 million car crashed each year, causing a half million injuries and 6,000 deaths. If passed, the penalty includes incarceration up to one year, and/or a $1,000 fine for anyone under 21 caught with a cellphone.

The bill also stated that “young people frequently use cellphones to bully and
Continue Reading One year in jail for possessing a cellphone?

January 10, 2020

That’s the penalty in Vermont proposed in a bill introduced in the state legislature in January, 2020. State Senator John Rodgers quoted statistics showing cell phones as one of the leading causes of teen deaths. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, the use of cell phones are involved in 1.6 million car crashes each year, causing a half million injuries and 6,000 deaths. If passed, the penalty for possessing a cell phone includes incarceration up to one year, and/or a $1,000 fine for anyone under 21 caught with a cell phone.

The bill also states that
Continue Reading One year in jail for possessing a cell phone?

In the November, 2018 elections across America, three 19 year-old students were on their state’s ballot and won. They campaigned on a variety of issues and succeeded regardless of their youth.

Kalan Haywood, a Democrat, was elected to the Wisconsin State Assembly. He began his political career at 13 when he collected signatures and posted signs for a local politician. He is now a college sophomore studying business. His interests as a lawmaker include education, voter registration, public safety and engaging youth in civic affairs.
Kalan commented about his run for office that “Being young is going to play well
Continue Reading Three teens elected to their state’s legislature*